beginning of a page. A menu is omitted.
locationHome > 組織でさがす > 広報課 > Introduction

Introduction

Printer Friendly Show Posted Date:2012年6月14日更新
Prev Page Menu Next Page Japanese

Cenotaph for victims of the atomic bombing

Hiroshima has long embraced a vision to achieve a world free of nuclear weapons, and have consistently worked toward that end, investing tangible resources. As the world continues to change in the 21st century, we now observe hopeful signs that we are moving forward that vision. President Obama has recommitted the United States to work toward the goal of a world without nuclear weapons, and has set a step to reduce the role of nuclear weapons in U.S. security policy as a concrete step toward that goal. In this proposal, we wish to take this historical moment to revamp the vision that has guided our contribution to global peace, so that the future generations may live in a more peaceful world.

We call on the leaders of the other governments with nuclear weapons to likewise commit their governments to the goal of a world without nuclear weapons and take concrete measures to stop arms race and start the disarmament process. We also call upon the leaders of non-nuclear weapon states to accept their shared responsibility to work toward nuclear disarmament. Their efforts to reduce the role of nuclear weapons in extended deterrence and increase multilateral control of the fuel cycle are important actions in that direction.

For its part, Hiroshima hereby recommits itself to renew its efforts to work toward a world without nuclear weapons. The proposal issued here is a call for partners in creative initiatives to address both longstanding and new emerging threats. Hiroshima cannot, of course, create a nuclear free world alone. But it can galvanize world public opinion, use its convening power to host annual roundtables, and inspire others to join us in this vital quest for a more secure future.

 
Kabul

Steps toward nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, however, are insufficient to achieve sustainable peace. Incessant violent civil wars and international conflicts have destroyed the lives of so many in the world, the very instability that lead toward further violence and terrorism. We must, therefore, work on conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction as we move for further nuclear disarmament.

Against this backdrop, we proposea 3 x 3 approach, which revolves around the three key challenges (1) nuclear abolition; (2) reconstruction and peacebuilding; and  (3) envisioning a new security system, and three actions: (1) generating theories for peace; (2) assisting peace making/building practices through human resource development and research; and (3) generating creative ideas and disseminating messages. In casting an enhanced vision we seek to continue efforts towards nuclear disarmament but at the same time embrace new initiatives for conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. In the following, we propose a set of concrete action plans that will take us to a world free of nuclear weapons, promote sustainable peace in regions torn apart by violent conflicts, with a new role for Hiroshima as a hub for global peace.

[3 x 3 approach toward a peaceful international community]

Three ChallengesThree Actions
  • Nuclear abolition
  • Reconstruction and peacebuilding
  • Envisioning a new security system
  • Generating theories and promoting studies
  • Implementing practical programs for peacebuilding
  • Disseminating peace messages

[Photo Courtesy] lower : UNITAR Hiroshima Office